Applying to Inc 5000 List? We Want to About Hear It!

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If you’re applying to the Inc 5000 List, we want to hear about it!

We’re looking for international growth from stories from companies looking to make the Inc 5000 List. Stories that fit our criteria will join Livestream and Spreadshirt and be featured in our running Forbes column. If you’re applying to the Inc 5000 List, Just fill out this form and we’ll let you know if you’re a match for our next article!

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Finding the Right Translation Service: 3 Things You Need to Know

Finding the right translation service can be a complicated process but it doesn’t have to be. Here are three articles we’ve published recently to help you find the right translation service.

Lesson 1: Find out how the translation service works and if you can trust it

The truth is, every translation service provider that deals with human translators is crowdsourced. Many of the traditional agencies and new startups use the same translators behind the scenes. The difference lies in how translators are brought into a community and how their performance is monitored when translating.

Earlier this year we wrote a piece in American Express’s OPEN Forum, 3 Tips for Choosing a Crowdsourcing Platform You Can Trust. The article encourages those shopping for human powered internet services to ask three fundamental questions:

Q1. Does the Platform Vet Its Crowd?
Q2. Is the Crowd Available 24/7?
Q3. How Much Control Do You Have Over Transparency?

Here’s a brief summary of our answers to those questions and a related graphic (your provider doesn’t have to give these exact answers, but we thought they’d be helpful):

A1. Yes. We are highly selective. Only 10% of our applicants are accepted into our translator and interpreter community.
A2. Yes. As a global company with a global translator base, we can translate your content anywhere, anytime.
A3. A lot. Our translation platform allows you to see where your files are in the translation process and who’s working on them.

How to choose the right translation service

These three questions are in no way the end-all-be-all to determining if you can trust a translation provider but they are a good start.

Lesson 2: Understand their commitment to customer support

A few months back we took some time to distill our customer feedback and publish 5 Things to Look for in an Online Customer Support Platform on Yahoo!. Here’s what we came up with:

  1. SLAs: Look for a clear and fair service licensing agreement (SLA). Specifically, the SLA should address any concerns you have around time of completion and percentage completed.
  2. Certifications: Are members of the crowd certified? If so, by what governing body and how rigorous of a process is involved?
  3. Experience: Experience is harder to fabricate. Place substantial value on those that have done a task or solved a problem before.
  4. Customer Feedback: If you do not see customer feedback displayed publicly, ask the company why not. If they do not have an answer (or fail to answer) you have likely weeded out a crowdsourcing company.
  5. Test Drive: Finally, try before you buy. Any company worth their salt will offer you a chance to test the system. If a company is requiring you to buy the product first, you are better off finding a competitor.

Lesson 3: Determine if this translation service is worth the investment

Cost is a key factor in any business decision and with the cost-per-word ranging from as low as free in machine translation to as high as $0.50-per-word from a traditional translation agency, finding a cost-effective solution is important. Here’s a look at the industry landscape:

the most cost effective solution to finding the right translation service

We offered up Three Questions To Ask Before Investing In Cloud-Based Software in Forbes a few months back, here they are:

Q1. How much work [and what types] can the platform handle?
Q2. How does the platform educate you on how to use the product?
Q3. What analytics do they track and what test do they run [and what feedback do they track]?

Just like any healthy company, being position to scale, engage customers, and address pain points are crucial to continuing to grow. A curated community and cloud-based service, should be able to handle nearly every type of translation request at scale. They should also allow the user to easily engage with their translation service on any device. Here’s a graphic we pulled together to help educate our prospects and customers that they can translate anything from anywhere:

A translation platform on any device

As for the final question around analytics and feedback, a translation provider should treat this as their lifeblood both on the customer and clients side of their business. If a company is truly people powered, then they need to place significant value on feedback from their people. Be sure to ask for case studies and testimonials before committing to a translation service.

We’d love to hear your thoughts and feed at customersupport@verbalizeit.com.

-The VerbalizeIt Team

Reaching International Customers: How Livestream and Spreadshirt Are Doing So and Winning

The following is a post from our co-founder and CEO, Ryan Frankel. It  originally appeared in Forbes under the title, “How To Reach The Six Billion Customers You’re Missing.”

Taking your company global can be daunting. The world is changing at a rapid rate and middle-class consumers are constantly cropping up in new markets. What’s the first step in tackling new global markets? Recognizing that there are nuanced cultural differences in every country. Each culture is different and consumers expect you to understand their way of life.

The following is an analysis of two high-growth companies—Livestream, which offers a live online streaming video service, and Spreadshirt, a website for creating and selling t-shirts—that are making the global leap while maintaining breakneck growth.

How Livestream is Reaching International Customers

How Livestream is Reaching International Customers

Livestream, which counts Facebook and The New York Times among its clients, has boosted sales by 613% over the past three years. The company is at the forefront of streaming content via the Internet.

Reaching international customers is a natural extension of Livestream’s business. Its two marquee clients alone allow the company to reach millions of international viewers, which prompts the logical question: Where should they head next?

South America. With widening access to mobile technology and the Internet, along with a rising middle class, South America offers a ripe market. Livestream could, theoretically, localize their product, messaging, and customer services for the region, beginning with translating the service into Portuguese and Spanish. But things aren’t that simple.

To enter South American markets, companies must navigate nation-specific broadcasting rights and get a grasp on each country’s tastes and preferences. Like any well-run company, Livestream prioritizes problems through a product roadmap. The first step is to address geo-blocking (the blocking of IP addresses from one nation to the next) and ensure they that have the foundation to expand into a new nation. This takes an understanding of the local nation’s laws and a concerted effort not to operate in legal grey areas.

After addressing the issue of geo-blocking, Livestream then breaks down the sources of their traffic in each region. Brazil, they found, is most promising. Livestream saw healthy rates of streaming not just on T.V.’s and desktops, but also on mobile. Brazil has more than 75 million smartphone users today, and the number of Android users in the country is greater than that of Japan or Germany. The World Cup and summer Olympics, both full of potential live-streaming events, are also coming up soon. Given these attributes, Livestream is now investing serious resources in the Brazilian market.

How Spreadshirt is Reaching International Customers

How Spreadshirt is Reaching International Customers

If not South America, then Livestream could take a note out of Spreadshirt’s playbook and look to conquer the European market. The company helps regular people design, sell and purchase t-shirts. It’s a simple concept that’s proved popular. Spreadshirt has grown sales by 335% over three years.

Spreadshirt’s approach to entering international markets starts with an edict laid out by CEO Philip Rooke: “Stay hyper-focused on the customer. Find out what the customer wants and expects, and deliver it before somebody else does.” With a customer-centric philosophy at its core, Spreadshirt secured 72,000 active online sellers and publishers around the world in 2013.

They’re supported by the company’s on-the-ground investments in Europe. Spreadshirt maintains a global headquarters in Leipzig, Germany, along with two manufacturing plants in Europe. Rooke continues, “We have invested heavily in our platform and products to become the best global full service partner for e-commerce, print, and fulfillment ideas.” The results are clear: today, Spreadshirt sells t-shirts in 17 countries, in no small part to the localization of their website into 15 languages.

As with any global company, there remains room to grow. In order to enter new markets, Spreadshirt will likely face challenges in currency exchanges, localizing content, and dealing with international shipping logistics. We’ve seen multinational corporations—Starbucks, Nike, etc.—expand their operations globally at impressive rates, but such a feat requires diligence and planning.

Spreadshirt made the international jump by localizing their website, and Livestream is using American content staples like Facebook and the New York Times to reach new audiences. There are many ways to go global and reaching the six billion non-native English speakers can be achieved faster than ever in today’s hyper-connected world. But truly engaging with international customers and building loyalty takes dedication to more than just content—it takes dedication to cultural context.

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Ninety-six percent of the world’s consumers live outside the U.S. Download our white paper, How to Take Your Growing Business Global, and learn how to reach the other ninety-six percent of the world.  

Reaching international customers

Free Translation Quote Tool

April is here an we have a new look. Here’s a quick rundown of our why our new site looks different and how some of our new clients are using our new free translation quote tool.

We designed our new website with you in mind. All you need to do is upload a file, get a quote, and start translating anything. It’s that easy. Try it for yourself and take a look below at how companies like, Estée Lauder, Desk.com, CORT Furniture, and TripAdvisor are growing globally through our translation services.

Try Our Free Translation Quote Tool

Now you can upload a document, your website, your app, your video or audio files, or request a live interpretation faster than ever.

Document Translation Quote

Below is a list of some of our new clients and how they’re using our new translation tools to grow their businesses. Our mission is to help you do the same. Try out our new platform and get an instant quote right now!-The VerbalizeIt Team

Here’s a list of companies that have used our free translation quote tool and are now loyal VerbalizeIt customers

Translating Video for Estée Lauder

We’re localizing videos for Estée Lauder to help preserve their brand in new markets around the globe. Learn more about our media transcription and translation services

Video Translation Quote

Translating Customer Requests for Desk.com via Our API

We’re teaming up with Desk.com to translate their client’s customer tickets through our translation API. Test out our API

Translation API

Adding Live Interpretation to CORT Furniture’s Shop Floors

We’re supplying Berkshire Hathaway’s CORT Furniture with live interpretation to improve their multinational customer service. Learn more about how our live interpretation works

Live Interpretation Quote Tool

Translating Documents for TripAdvisor

TripAdvisor needed to translate their HR policies into multiple languages for their 2,100 global employees. We delivered TripAdvisor’s HR policies across multiple languages. Learn more about our document translation services

Document Translation Quote Tool

 

Test out our new free translation quote tool today and see how we stack up!