Top Ten Translation Stories of 2013

At the end of 2013 we asked our 17,000 person translator and interpreter community to submit the top ten translation stories for 2013. Once we had them in hand, we asked our community to vote on what they thought was most important to the translation and interpretation industry. Here’s what we came up with… 

#10 Fortissimo takes one-third stake in One Hour Translation 
–Steven Scheer, Reuters

“Israeli private equity group Fortissimo Capital has acquired one-third of One Hour Translation, a provider of online professional translation of documents, for an investment of $10 million.”

#9 Twenty-Two Chinese Signs That Got “Seriously Lost in Translation” –BuzzFeed

Click on BuzzFeed to see all of the signs…

#8 Spanish language barrier on ObamaCare sign-ups –Geoff Earle, New York Post

WASHINGTON — No comprendo, senor presidente.There are indications Spanish speakers aren’t signing up for ObamaCare in hoped-for numbers, with language barriers, deficient sites and a digital gap seen as likely reasons…

#7 Google Translate gets support for nine new languages, bringing total to 80 –Emil Protalinski, The Next Web

Google today announced it has added support for nine new languages in Google Translate, bringing the service’s total to 80 languages. The additions aren’t unpopular by any means either: they span Africa, Asia, and Oceania with over 200 million native speakers collectively…

#6 Twitter Updates Its Windows Phone App With In-Stream Translation To 54 Languages –Alex Wilhelm (@alex), TechCrunch

Twitter updated its Windows Phone application today to include in-stream tweet translation to 54 languages, which is powered by Bing. Tweets can now be displayed on the lock screen of Windows Phone devices. This will come in handy when Nokia’s ‘Glance’ feature is released for the platform, which allows information to be displayed even when a phone is locked. Twitter updates will presumably be viewable with that feature when it reaches general availability…

#5 Facebook Acquires “Mobile Technologies”, Developer Of Speech Translation App Jibbigo –Josh Constine (@joshconstine), TechCrunch

Facebook’s latest acquisition could help it connect users across language barriers. It has just announced that it’s acquired the team and technology of Pittsburgh’s Mobile Technologies, a speech recognition and machine translation startup that developed the app Jibbigo. From voice search to translated News Feed posts, Facebook could to a lot with this technology…

#4 Everything You Wanted To Know About The Giant Elance, oDesk Merger & Ensuing Backlash (But Were Afraid To Ask) –Rip Empson (@ripemp), TechCrunch

Earlier this year, Seamless and Grubhub announced that their companies would be joining forces in a blockbuster merger. Already two of the biggest names in online food-ordering, the prospect of a combined “Grubless” sent ripples through the market. Once upon a time, these kind of massive private mergers only happened once in a blue moon, but those were different times…

#3 Next Google Glass Tricks Include Translating the World From Your Eyes –Liz Gannes (@LizGannes), AllThingsD

Imagine you’re traveling in a country whose language you don’t speak. You look up at a sign — say, a caution marker, or a list of directions. Oh, also, you’re wearing Google Glass. You say, “Okay Glass, translate this.” The words on the sign transform into your home language, so when you look through Glass, you can read them…

#2 A Small Company’s Reality Is Altered by ABCs ‘Shark Tank’ –Mark Cohen, New York Times

It has been about a month since ABC showed the season finale of “Shark Tank,” the reality show that gives entrepreneurs in search of financing a chance to plead their cases before five tough-talking investors, or “sharks.” At VerbalizeIt, a [translation] technology start-up that was part of this season’s final segment, the effects of the show’s appearance can already be quantified…

#1 Google app translation service now available to Android devs –John Ribeiro (@Johnribeiro), PC World

Google has made its app translation service available to all Android developers to enable them to offer their apps in different languages. The service, first previewed in May at Google I/O, allows developers to purchase professional app translations through the Google Play Developer Console from third-party service providers at prices ranging on an average from $75 for a small app to $150 for a large app per language…

Did we miss anything? Let us know at communications@verbalizeit.com

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